Online Resources


Following are links to many, various websites that can provide information toward helping build "green." The links are loosely organized according to the Built Green checklists, following the six major categories of Codes, Site & Water, Energy, Indoor Air Quality, Materials Resources and few additional resources that don't fit neatly into the other Built Green categories.

Codes

Sites & Water

Energy

Indoor Air Quality

Materials

Related Sustainability Topics

Other Local & National Resources


Codes

Codes, Regulations & Standards

  • King County Code: See Title 21A Zoning for Sensitive Areas information.Click here to visit external link
  • King County Property, Planning & Development:ac To facilitate property research in the county, the county website. Click here to visit external link
  • Washington State Health Department's Graywater Reuse Rule Development: Follow the development of graywater use regulations and find updates on the state's rule progression. Click here to visit external link
  • Washington State Energy Code (WSEC): Refer to Washington State Building Code WAC 51-11 Chapters 11-20 for the Washington State Non-Residential Energy Code. For most projects in King County, except those also in the city of Seattle, will be governed by the WSEC. To qualify for LEED the project must meet WSEC and ASHRAE 90.1-1999. Click here to visit external link
  • Municipal Codes - Washington State: Provides links to codes for cities in Washington State. Click here to visit external link
  • ASHRAE Standards: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings can be purchased and downloaded from this site. Click here to visit external link
  • Washington State Building Codes: Scroll to Chapter 51-13 WAC for Ventilation and IAQ. Click here to visit external link
  • King County Uniform Mechanical Code:
    Click here to visit external link
  • Residential Energy Code City of Seattle: These forms provide a checklist of building systems that could be useful in the early phases of developing building systems. Click here to visit external link
  • Environmentally Sensitive Areas, King County Code: This document describes local codes that protect the environment and health of the county. Click here to visit external link
  • King County Zoning Code: See King County Zoning Code Title 21A (Under King County Code). Click here to visit external link
  • King County Zoning Code: King County Development Standards Density and Dimensions (Zoning Code Title 21A). Click here to visit external link
  • Washington State Health Department's Graywater Reuse Rule Development: Follow the development of graywater use regulations and find updates on the state's rule progression. Click here to visit external link
  • Washington Water Reclamation and Reuse Standards: Washington State has existing standards for reclaimed water, which is derived from municipal wastewater. The standards also include provisions for the beneficial use of graywater, agricultural industrial process water, and industrial reuse water, all of which can be considered in innovative wastewater programs. Click here to visit external link
  • King County Water Systems Defined: This county website describes the differences between Group A and Group B public water systems and categorizes different types of Group A public water systems. Click here to visit external link
  • ASHRAE 62-1999: The published standard that specifies minimum ventilation rates and indoor air quality acceptable to human occupants. Click here to visit external link
  • Revised Code of Washington: Click here to visit external link

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Sites & Water

Site Planning

  • King County Comprehensive Plan: Review the general guidelines. Click here to visit external link
  • King County iMaps: See the King County iMaps (Planning Set) for property information and area densities. A property search can be done that yields the lot size (and the building square footage) for any address in the county. Click here to visit external link
  • Transfer of Development Rights: This program allows individuals to purchase and sell residential development rights from lands such as open space or forested parcels. Click here to visit external link
  • Federal Emergency Management Agency: For federal guidelines, check the FEMA website. Click here to visit external link
  • King County Property, Planning & Development: To facilitate property research in the county, the county website. Click here to visit external link
  • King County Department of Development & Environmental Services: This website provides information on properties in the County. Click here to visit external link
  • King County Development Standards: See the King County Development Standards for parking and circulation guidelines. Click here to visit external link
  • Resource Lands and Open Space Programs: Reference the King County Natural Resources and Parks, Water and Land Resources Division Information by topic that lists "Open Space and Resource Land Protection Programs." Click here to visit external link
  • Development Guidelines: Refer to the Environmentally Sensitive Areas in King County listing within the King County Development Guidelines. Click here to visit external link

Stormwater & Erosion Control

  • King County Surface Water Design Manual Appendix D. Click here to visit external link
  • King County Surface Water Design Manual: For a more in-depth look at King County's standards for dealing with stormwater, check out the Surface Water Design Manual (all projects in unincorporated King County must follow these standards). The document is for sale through the county's Land and Water Resources Division. To purchase a copy, send a check or money order for a total of $146 ($125 for the manual, $11 for tax, $10 for shipping) to: WLRD, Attn: Andrea, 201 S. Jackson Street Suite 600, Seattle WA 98104-3855
    King County Surface Water Design Supporting Software: Supporting software and data is available online. Click here to visit external link
  • King County Surface Water Design Manual Supporting Documents: Research the supporting documents of the King County Surface Water Design Manual. Click here to visit external link
  • Erosion and Sedimentation Control Standards: Appendix D: Appendix D of the King County Surface Water Design Manual describes the erosion and sedimentation control standards for all county projects. Click here to visit external link
  • King County Building Code: Refer to the Surface Water Management section of the King County Building Code. Click here to visit external link
  • Surface Water Management Fee Discounts and Cost-Sharing: Learn about fee discounts in King County for adopting certain measures designed to limit stormwater flow. Click here to visit external link
  • Stormwater Best Management Practices: A list of Best Management Practices assembled to help guide the design of public works projects. Click here to visit external link
  • Soils for Salmon: Local guidelines for protecting salmon habitat. Click here to visit external link
  • Department of Ecology Landslides Program: See the local planning department for information about required setbacks, vegetation removal, septic placement, drainage, and any restrictions on the project site. Click here to visit external link
  • Erosion and Sediment Control and the Endangered Species Act: Assistance on the design of an effective erosion and sediment control program that protects waterbodies, wetlands and aquatic species. Click here to visit external link
  • Bank Stabilization: Check out this website to learn more about stabilizing streambanks and riparian zones in King County. Click here to visit external link

Habitat Restoration

  • Earthcorps: This non-profit focuses on local environmental service and can help with environmental restoration through its unique combination of volunteerism and community involvement . Click here to visit external link
  • Seattle Public Utilities: Tips and rebates for automatic irrigation and sprinkler systems. Click here to visit external link
  • Harvesting Rainwater for Landscape Use: This article, published by the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension Service, provides methods for roughly calculating rainwater supply based on rainfall, storage area and calculating demand based on landscaping needs. Click here to visit external link
  • Rainbarrels for Small Projects in King County: Rainbarrels can provide effective means of collecting rainwater for use in a small landscape. Click here to visit external link
  • Washington State Health Department's Graywater Reuse Rule Development: Follow the development of graywater use regulations and find updates on the state's rule progression. Click here to visit external link
  • Graywater Fact Sheet: The Washington State Department of Health provides a brief information sheet on graywater - what it is and how it can be used. Click here to visit external link
  • Captured Rainwater: The Sustainable Building Sourcebook offers guidance on rainwater harvest systems. Click here to visit external link
  • King Street Center Rainwater Harvest System: King County offices in King Street Center use harvested rainwater to flush toilets. Click here to visit external link
  • Rainwater Harvest Article: Landscape Architecture magazine's article on a University of Washington professor's rainwater system. Click here to visit external link
  • Texas Guide to Rainwater Harvesting: This publication contains some useful information on harvesting rainwater even if the site is not in Texas. Click here to visit external link
  • Saving Water Partnership: This site provides landscape and irrigation recommendations for saving water. Click here to visit external link
  • King County Water Reuse Program: Reclaimed water is wastewater that gets treated to such a high level that it can be used safely and effectively for non-drinking water uses such as flushing toilets. The county encourages the reuse of water in landscape and agricultural irrigation, heating and cooling, and industrial processing. Click here to visit external link

Water-Saving Landscapes

  • Waterwise Gardening Guides for City of Bellevue: Bellevue offers guidance on using less potable water in the landscape and irrigation tune-up tips
    Click here to visit external link
  • Native Plants in Washington: This is a link to a publication from Washington State University that provides useful information on native plants and trees, along with a link to an extensive native plant database. Click here to visit external link
  • Washington Native Plant Society: This website provides information on native plants and links to other native plant sites. Click here to visit external link
  • King County Native Plant Resource: This list is compiled by staff of the Water and Land Resources Division of King County, Washington as an aid to learning about northwest native plants. Click here to visit external link
  • Seattle Public Utilities: SPU's Water Efficient Irrigation Program offers free assessments and financial incentives for saving water in the landscape. Click here to visit external link

Non-Toxic Landscapes

  • Integrated Pest Management: The University of California at Davis maintains an extensive website on integrated pest management (IPM). IPM is an ecosystem-based strategy that focuses on long-term prevention of pests or their damage through a combination of techniques such as biological control, habitat manipulation, modification of cultural practices, and use of resistant varieties. Click here to visit external link

Wastewater

  • King County Wastewater Treatment Division: This website contains information on treating and conveying the county's wastewater: Washington State Health Department's Graywater Reuse Rule Development: Follow the development of graywater use regulations and find updates on the state's rule progression. Click here to visit external link
  • Washington State Health Department's Graywater Reuse Rule Development: Follow the development of graywater use regulations and find updates on the state's rule progression. Click here to visit external link
  • Washington On-Site Sewage Association: The WOSSA provides information on the siting, design, installation, use and regulation of on-site wastewater systems. Click here to visit external link
  • On-Site Sewage Systems: Puget Sound Water Quality Action Team describes how on-site sewage systems operated in the Puget Sound basin can effectively treat sewage in areas not served by municipal treatment plants. Click here to visit external link
  • EPA On-Site Wastewater Treatment: This EPA website discusses decentralized treatment systems including individual onsite septic systems, cluster systems, and alternative wastewater technologies. Click here to visit external link
  • Washington State Health Department's Graywater Reuse Rule Development: Follow the development of graywater use regulations and find updates on the state's rule progression. Click here to visit external link
  • Water Reclamation and Reuse in Washington State: This website offers information on water reuse in the State, from defining graywater to how to obtain a permit for a generator of reclaimed water. Click here to visit external link
  • Washington Water Reclamation and Reuse Standards: Washington State has existing standards for reclaimed water, which is derived from municipal wastewater. The standards also include provisions for the beneficial use of graywater, agricultural industrial process water, and industrial reuse water, all of which can be considered in innovative wastewater programs. Click here to visit external link

Water Conservation

  • King County Water Systems Defined: This county website describes the differences between Group A and Group B public water systems and categorizes different types of Group A public water systems. Click here to visit external link
  • City of Bellevue Drinking Water Conservation: Bellevue offers different strategies for conserving potable water. Click here to visit external link
  • Low-Flow Fixtures: The National Association of Home Builders Research Center provides ToolBase Services, a technical database that includes information on resource efficient plumbing. Click here to visit external link
  • Saving Water Partnership: This site offers tips on water smart technologies to help reduce potable water demands. Click here to visit external link

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Energy

Energy Optimization

  • ASHRAE Standards: ASHRAE Standards can be purchased and downloaded from this site. Click here to visit external link
  • Advanced Buildings Technology: A Canadian-based guide to more than 90 environmentally-appropriate technologies and practices for multi-unit residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Click here to visit external link
  • U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: This site provides information and links on energy efficiency technologies and programs. Click here to visit external link
  • Energy Star (EPA) Click here to visit external link
  • Energy & Environmental Building Association Click here to visit external link
  • Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (DOE) Click here to visit external link
  • Northwest Energy Star Click here to visit external link

Efficient Lighting

  • Efficient Lighting: Click here to visit external link
  • Lighting Design Guide: This guide from the USDOE provides the designer with an idea of what to look for when considering lighting for specific spaces and purposes. Click here to visit external link

Daylighting

  • Lighting Design Lab: The Daylighting Lab is part of the Lighting Design Lab in Seattle, and has an overcast sky and heliodon sun simulators, and digital photographic and light flux metering equipment for the analysis of physical models to help projects assess daylighting capabilities. The lab is sponsored by Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, a non-profit group of electric utilities, state governments, public interest groups and efficiency industry representatives, who came together to help Northwest consumers and businesses use electricity more efficiently. Click here to visit external link
  • Daylighting in Buildings: A downloadable source book on daylighting systems and components from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This book provides a comprehensive reference on new and innovative technologies for utilizing daylight in buildings and assesses the performance of these systems. Click here to visit external link

    Daylighting: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory explores daylighting and windows on its website. Click here to visit external link
  • Daylighting Initiative: Pacific Gas and Electric Company, a large natural gas and electric utility in California, provides information on daylighting along with case studies. Click here to visit external link
  • Daylighting Collaborative: The Daylighting Collaborative is a program started by several utilities and the State of Wisconsin to incorporate daylighting into mainstream design and construction. The website offers a wealth of information on daylighting strategies and resources. Click here to visit external link
  • National Institute of Building Sciences: Information on daylighting including general concepts, application, and additional resources. Click here to visit external link
  • Tips for Daylighting with Windows: Comprehensive advice from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Building Technologies Department helps you select a plan for daylighting a building. Click here to visit external link

Solar Power

  • U. S. Department of Energy: DOE presents solar technologies that use the sun's energy and light to provide heat, light, hot water, electricity, and cooling for homes, businesses, and industry. Click here to visit external link
  • U. S. Department of Energy: Active solar power is achieved using semi-conducting materials that directly convert sunlight into electricity for use in homes, offices or large-scale applications. Click here to visit external link
  • Consumer Affairs: Resources for solar financing and installation. Click here to visit external link

Efficient Waterheating

  • Performance Comparison of Residential Hot Water Systems: this report by the NAHB Research Center presents the results of weekly performance testing and annual simulations of electric water-heating systems. Click here to visit external link
  • U. S. Department of Energy: DOE describes various solar water heaters that use the sun to heat either water or a heat-transfer fluid in collectors, using passive or active systems. Click here to visit external link

Renewable Energy

  • U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: This site provides information and links on renewable energy technologies and programs. Click here to visit external link
  • Washington Incentives for Renewable Energy: Database for state incentives for renewable energy. Click here to visit external link
  • PVWATTS Calculator: PVWATTS calculates electrical energy produced by a grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system. Click here to visit external link
  • Seattle City Light Net Metering Program: Seattle City Light offers Net Metering to customers who wish to generate their own electricity with fuel cells or solar, wind or hydro powered electric systems of 25 kilowatts or less in generating capacity. Click here to visit external link
  • Seattle City Light's guide to getting started with solar with links to net metering and compliance forms. Click here to visit external link
  • Puget Sound Energy Net Metering: This page describes the standards and schedule for renewable generation and links to enrollment documents
    Click here to visit external link

Green Power

  • Green-e Renewable Energy Certification Program: Green-e is a voluntary certification program for renewable electricity products. The Green-e Program sets consumer protection and environmental standards for electricity products, and verifies that Green-e certified products meet these standards. Click here to visit external link
  • Puget Sound Energy Green Power: Purchase Green-e tags or TRCs, Tradable Renewable Certificates, in partnership with the Bonneville Environmental Foundation. Click here to visit external link
  • Green Energy Option Purchase Rider Example from Puget Sound Energy:
    Click here to visit external link
  • Seattle City Light Green Power: Purchase green energy credits that invest in green power demonstration projects and renewable power purchase. This program is not Green-e certified or equivalent, and does not qualify for the LEED Green Power credit. Seattle City Light customers can purchase TRCs from Green-e providers nationwide to meet the Green Power credit. Click here to visit external link

Building Commissioning

  • Commissioning Guide: The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Commissioning: The Key to Quality Assurance

Brick has an almost unlimited lifespan and its production creates very little wasted material